Thought for the Week

The Olympic Games is going well and many medals have already been won. Winning athletes have been ecstatic whilst others have sometimes been in despair.

The pressure to win is very great. After 4 years of preparation, everything depends on the performance on the day and not everyone can succeed. The greater the expectation of success the greater the disappointment when you do not win a medal.

At the medal ceremonies for London 2012 the Chariots of Fire theme tune has been played. The tune reminds us of Eric Liddell, the “Flying Scotsman”, who competed for Great Britain in the Olympic Games in Paris in 1924. When the schedule for the heats of the 100 metres was announced, Eric realised that the first heat would be run on a Sunday. He was a Christian and always kept Sunday as a special day set apart to worship God and rest. He realised that he would not, therefore, be able to compete in his best event and quietly withdrew from the 100 metres. He began instead to train for the 400 metres in which he was not expected to win a medal.

When Eric was at the starting block for the 400 metres race an American man slipped a piece of paper into his hand with the words of 1 Samuel Chapter 2, verses 30 written on it, “Those who honour me I will honour.” Eric won the race and broke the Olympic and world records. He also won a bronze medal in the 200 metres. Eric’s example of putting God first above everything else continues to inspire people today. Although he was as keen to win as any athlete competing in London 2012 he knew that honouring God was more important.

Eric was born in China in 1902, where his parents were missionaries. In 1925 he went to China as a missionary where he worked amongst poor people and proclaimed the good news of Jesus. In 1943, when the fighting between the Chinese army and the invading Japanese army was very fierce, he was interned at the Weihsien Internment Camp. Whilst in the camp Eric refused an offer to leave and gave his place instead to a pregnant woman. He died in the camp on 21 February 1945 from an inoperable brain tumour. His last words were, “It’s complete surrender.” He had gladly given his whole life to Jesus Christ, and has now received the ultimate victor’s crown which his Saviour won for him.