Former Ballymoney woman raises £1,600 for Cancer Research

PRESENT. Ann Tweed from Ballyclare along with her granddaughters, Grace (3) and Hannah (5) Caldwell presented a cheque for �1600 to Sarah Davis of Cancer Research. Ann with the help of family and friends raised the monies through events including sponsored walks, fire side quiz's and the Lisburn 10k Run. INBM32-11 9005F.
PRESENT. Ann Tweed from Ballyclare along with her granddaughters, Grace (3) and Hannah (5) Caldwell presented a cheque for �1600 to Sarah Davis of Cancer Research. Ann with the help of family and friends raised the monies through events including sponsored walks, fire side quiz's and the Lisburn 10k Run. INBM32-11 9005F.

A BALLYMONEY native who has twice survived breast cancer recently presented Cancer Research UK with a cheque for £1,600.

Ann Tweed, who now lives in Ballyclare, said: “We are just so grateful to everyone who has supported us continually over the last few years.

“Our family did our annual sponsored walk in Ballymoney, my sister and husband did the Lisburn 10K fun run and my brother and sister-in-law undertook another sponsored walk along the coast. Together with a fireside quiz, money boxes and donations, it amounted to £1,600.

“It’s fabulous”.

Cancer Research UK is the largest single funder of breast cancer research in the UK, spending over £44 million on groundbreaking work last year. As breast cancer is still the most common cancer in the UK, Cancer Research UK’s work is vital.

Sarah Davis, Cancer Research UK’s Area Volunteer Manager said: “Cancer Research UK’s work underpins today’s treatments for women with breast cancer.

“Our scientists carry out vital clinical trials.

“They test new treatments and improve existing ones.

“Crucial studies of the drug tamoxifen, for example, have already helped save thousands of lives. Cancer Research UK are funding Professor Paul Harkin who works at the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology in Belfast. He is investigating the function of an important gene called BRCA1. Faults in this gene cause some inherited breast cancers. The gene is also often found to be damaged in breast cancers that occur by chance.

“Understanding more about how BRCA1 works may help scientists to design better cancer treatments.

“We need everyone to ‘Join the fight for women’s survival.’

“Our research is beating breast cancer. We need local people to help us fight harder. There are lots of ways to get involved. We have created a special fundraising pack, full of ideas, to help you.

“To ‘Join the fight for women’s survival’ and receive a free Cancer Research UK fundraising pack, visit www.jointhefight.org.uk or call 08701 60 20 40”.