Debbie lacing up for Cancer Research

BEST FOOT FORWARD. Pictured is Springwell runner, Debbie Tutty, who is taking part in the Great North Run for the first time to raise funds for Cancer Research UK.INBM30-11 057SC.
BEST FOOT FORWARD. Pictured is Springwell runner, Debbie Tutty, who is taking part in the Great North Run for the first time to raise funds for Cancer Research UK.INBM30-11 057SC.

By Adam Carroll

BALLYMONEY woman Debbie Tutty is preparing to pound the streets in the name of Cancer Research.

Debbie (39) - along with three others from the Springwell Running Club - will be travelling to Newcastle, England on 18 September where they will compete in the 13.1 mile BUPA Great North Run.

The BUPA Great North Run is the world’s most popular half marathon and was founded by BBC Sports commentator and Olympic Bronze medalist Brendan Foster.

The event which began on the 28 June 1981 has become more and more popular with time. Originally beginning with 12,000 participants and now attracting as many as 54,000 people.

Debbie, who works in Tesco, Ballymoney, first got involved with the Ballymoney branch of Cancer Research UK through working with the chairman Mervyn Ferris on several other projects.

Debbie has also been assisting with the popular annual Ballymoney Fun Run in Riverside Park for the last three years.

Training for the Great North Run is extensive and Debbie has been preparing with four sessions a week.

Debbie stated that she is “so grateful for all the support that has been given from all at the Springwell Running Club”.

These sessions include 14 mile long runs, hill work and sprints.

Debbie is aiming to raise between £500 and £1000, sponsorship forms are available by contacting her on Facebook.

Cancer Research UK fund all types of research, from scientists working in labs, to doctors testing new drugs in hospitals, to researchers investigating the causes of cancer using data from large groups of people.

This includes research into childhood cancer, which has helped to transform survival rates for children with cancer.

Today, three quarters of children are successfully treated, compared with around a quarter in the 1960’s.

The Children’s Cancer Trials Team co-ordinates groundbreaking trials at the Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children. These trials offer new treatments to children with cancer, giving them the chance to benefit from the latest research.

Cancer Research UK supports more than 50 researchers in Belfast, based at the Centre for Cancer Research & Cell Biology and the Cancer Centre at Belfast City Hospital.

The charity also jointly fund the Northern Ireland Cancer Trials Network, which give patients across the region access to a variety of clinical trials. We’re helping support five research nurses based at the hospitals in Altnagelvin, Antrim, Belfast, Craigavon and Dundonald.

They raise awareness of clinical trials as an option for treatment and care for people taking part.

Cancer Research UK fund all types of research, from scientists working in labs, to doctors testing new drugs in hospitals, to researchers investigating the causes of cancer using data from large groups of people.

This includes research into childhood cancer, which has helped to transform survival rates for children with cancer.

Today, three quarters of children are successfully treated, compared with around a quarter in the 1960’s. The Children’s Cancer Trials Team co-ordinates groundbreaking trials at the Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children. These trials offer new treatments to children with cancer, giving them the chance to benefit from the latest research.

The Cancer Research door-to-door collection starts on Monday evening.

Then on Saturday 6 August the annual parade of vintage and classic vehicles takes place in Ballymoney.