Blythswood shops helping worldwide

Mapping the progress which Blythswood Cares shops in Ballymoney and Coleraine are making to support vulnerable children in India is Harry Latimer, Chief Operating Officer, Blythswood Ireland, pictured (centre) with Pastor Emmanuel and Annie Milton from the Siloam Youth and Childrens Aid Mission in Chennai.
Mapping the progress which Blythswood Cares shops in Ballymoney and Coleraine are making to support vulnerable children in India is Harry Latimer, Chief Operating Officer, Blythswood Ireland, pictured (centre) with Pastor Emmanuel and Annie Milton from the Siloam Youth and Childrens Aid Mission in Chennai.

Old furniture, clothes, books, electrical items, bric-a-brac, jewellery, kitchenware and unwanted gifts from homes in Ballymoney and Coleraine are transforming lives thousands of miles away in India.

Cash raised for items donated to the Blythswood shops at Meeting House Lane in Ballymoney and at Sperrin Business Park in Coleraine is supporting Siloam Youth and Children’s Aid Mission (SYCAM) in providing residential care and education for vulnerable children and young people in Chennai, the largest city in Southern India, and enabling children from low-income families in the locality to attend the Carmel Christian School.

This week Pastors Emmanuel and Annie Milton who direct the work of SYCAM in their home city of Chennai were in Northern Ireland to thank Blythswood and its supporters for twelve years of support and report on the positive impact which Northern Irish donations are having on young lives.

Rev Emmanuel Milton said, “When we founded Sycam in 1976 our vision was to support the poorest of the poor through God’s love and kindness and, since then, we have been privileged to act as stand-in parents to children who have been forsaken by society and their own families. Our mission is to encourage, educate and empower them – and we can only do that with the active support of organisations such as Blythswood Care. The people who donate their unwanted ‘clutter’, do a little shopping or volunteer to work at any of the eight Blythswood Ireland charity shops across Northern Ireland can little imagine how much good they are doing for vulnerable, often destitute, children in a far off country.”